Saturday, 23 June 2018

Destination - Berlin



Source: Free range

Berlin brings to one's mind, the Great Divide (or wall) that split the city into two different political entities. However, the newly rejuvenated and reunited Berlin is marching into the future, post millennium. It is casting itself in the light of a new and modern city of Continental Europe .

Berlin 's dark past as Hitler's capital of Nazi atrocities, and as the capital of Cold War in the later years, has not escaped the psyche of the local population or the visitors. Popular opinion is that Berliners do not know where they are going, but know their past, and do not want to go back there. After being completely annihilated in the WW II bombings, Berlin has since rebuilt itself as a modern structure of glass and steel.

The scars still remain, mostly as a tourist attraction. For example the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church displays the shell of the bell tower that remains, in striking contrast to the modern church constructed to the west, fondly nicknamed “lipstick and powderbox" because of the design.

The contrast between East and West Berlin before the wall fell is still evident since East Berlin proud of its cultural heritage rebuilt its museums and churches whereas West Berlin built new museums and theatres.

East and West are still coming together to form a whole Berlin and the process will take its time.

Berlin , being the new German capital is living up to its reputation as the dynamic hub of continental Europe , with nightlife at its most exciting and wild. The city after accommodating the German Government as the seat of the new capital has undergone a major facelift with new streets, skyscrapers and rail lines at a whopping cost of more than $100 billion. Most of this has gone into the central district (Mitte) which houses glittering luxury hotels and shopping arcades. The effort in restoration of Unter den Linden to its pre war glory and Hotel Adlon, the most famous hotel in pre war Germany and Europe has been notable.

The chic district of boutiques and cafes, the Prenzlauer Berg, was not too damaged by WW II bombings and restoration of this area has been relatively easier. This flurry of restoration and activity has caused a spiraling effect in the real estate market with sharp increase in prices as well inconveniences of living around construction sites for Berliners. Most famous buildings of Berlin have been restored in this process. Reichstag now has a new glass dome topped with the Eagle (national symbol) replacing the old imperial hunter.

The Oranienburger Strasse Synagogue (also known as Neue Synagoge Berlin-Centrum Judaicum/The New Synagogue), bombed beyond repair by Allied bombers, has been restored to its old splendor. Likewise, Berlin Cathedral and the five state museums on Museum Island have been restored to their original glory. The natural beauty of Berlin has been enhanced with the few gardens and farms covering about 1/3rd of the total area, which further beautifies the city.

The Berlin Tourist Information Center , Europa Center handles all information regarding Berlin in general and Hotel bookings. The best and easier way to access the information is from the site www.berlin-tourism.de.


Author: Ken Charnly

Friday, 22 June 2018

Cheap Airfare to Europe


Source: Free range


It is often tiresome to search for cheap airfare between European cities and has been near hopeless for a number of years. Travelers were told that Europeans didn't bother offering cheap airfare. Instead of by air, they traveled at a low cost within Europe using the railway system or rented cars to get around if required.

However, now there are situations where cheap airfares within Europe are in fact the only option, peculiarly when time is of the essence. Some travelers cannot afford to pay not-so-cheap prices to get from Point A to Point B using airfare within Europe, but they often require to get there faster than say, by car.

The primary point to consider when researching cheap airfares within Europe is to look and see if you can arrive and depart from cities different than your originals. Why? Because a different terminal may be cheaper to fly from, or to, when planning airfare within Europe. Restructuring a trip to admit for a little more travel isn't terribly bad, especially IF there are giant savings, yes?

The problem with really cheap airfares within Europe is that there can be strings attached.

Perhaps your return trip will be almost twice the cost of the one that got you there in the first place. Or the dates you can choose to travel may be very restrictive. And don't forget that the tax on some of these cheap airfares within Europe is as a rule more than the flight itself.

Also, be sure to bear in mind that shopping for cheap European airfares isn't the same as in North America. There aren't many connecting flights in Europe and the majority of cheap airfares are straight, city to city runs.

Places to Look for Cheap Airfares within Europe

It may be important to note that we are not supporting any of the following airlines. It's a reasonable starting point for cheap European airfare, however. Here are some of the movers and shakers in the cheap European airfare game so you can get started with your cheap airfare within Europe research.

Basiq Air - Has a home base in Holland and flies to 20 cities, give or take. Flights from Amsterdam run anywhere between 30-60 EUR ($37-74 USD).

BMI Baby Airlines - Offers routes across Europe.

Simple Jet - A very large amount of routes across Europe. However, there is an extra burden if you book with a credit card, and there are no refunds, unless there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. death of a family member).

Germania Express - Discount flights between Spain, Italy, Germany and Greece.

Sky Europe - Apparently the cardinal deduct airline in middle Europe.

Snowflake - Caters for the Mediterranean from Europe.

Continent Express - Taxes and fees at this locale are incomparably higher than the authentic fares.

Volare Airlines - An Italian based airline.

Wizz Air - A new airline, but quite prolific with it's customers. Travels between Warsaw and Athens.

Finding doesn't have to be an uphill battle. As long as you're armed with the correct facts and appropriate resources, you're on your way to finding that cheap airfare!


Author: Zahid Saddique
Source

Wednesday, 20 June 2018

Secrets Of The London Tube



Image source: Free range


Although it's many years since I left my home in London I still occasionally use The Tube, as the London Underground is affectionately known.

Hold on. Affectionately? Does anybody actually hold any affection for the network of tunnels that run beneath the surface of our capital, or the rolling stock that runs through them?

They’re over-crowded, far too warm and stuffy (the temperature in the tunnels is about 10 C higher than at ground level), and the views are pretty dire. In central London, all you’re likely to see is the dark walls of the tunnels, although if you’re lucky, you might just get a glimpse of another train passing in another tunnel through one of the gaps between them. Funnily enough, contrary to popular belief, the majority of The Tube is actually over ground. Not that there’s much scenic stimulation along those stretches either. You might see some fascinating factories, some interesting piles of rubbish that have mysteriously grown along the sidings and a few back gardens, but nothing much else.

Anybody who’s ever regularly used The Tube during peak hours will tell you that using this particular form of transport can take great courage and will power. The platforms are crowded to the point where those at the front, closest to the lines, can find themselves fearing for their lives. We’re warned to stand behind the line, which is painted about three feet away from the platform edge, but with all those people behind you, all wanting to get forward and have a chance of getting on the next arriving train, the platform edge can quickly become dangerously close.

Having a position at the front doesn’t necessarily guarantee you a place on the next train though. Oh, no. Whether or not you’ll actually get on it will depend largely upon where on the platform you’re positioned and whether or not the carriage doors will be in front of you when the train stops. If you happen to be standing between two doors, then you’re very unlucky indeed. One way around this is to look at those ‘stand behind’ lines. As the rolling stock on each line of the underground are generally of the same type (the trains differ from line to line) and stop at more or less the same point (note: more or less… this isn’t an exact science), the ‘stand behind’ lines will be more worn where the doors are likely to be. Find those spots and you’ll have a better change of boarding the next one, unless of course the lines are freshly painted, in which case, bad luck.

This next point should be obvious to everybody but unfortunately, my experience tells me that this isn’t the case. When the train stops, even if you’re lucky enough to be standing in front of the doors, LET PASSENGERS OFF THE TRAIN FIRST! Don’t just push your way on, even if others are doing so. It’s bad manners and can cause nasty accidents.

Once on the train, you’ll no doubt have to stand as there are few seats compared with the amount of passengers being transported during peak hours. It’s standard etiquette to offer your seat to elderly passengers and those carrying small children, whether still in the comfortable confines of the womb or otherwise. Anybody else will have little chance of finding a seat. The more experienced underground travellers have their strategies though; they'll target a seat.

Those reading are unlikely to be travelling just a few stops, and although they could have been travelling for ages already, they rarely make good targets. Study people’s faces. If they look bored, they’ve probably already been there a while so maybe they’ll be alighting soon? Mind you, people do get very bored very quickly on The Tube, so they could just as easily have joined the train at the station before yours.

When it comes to seats that are vacated during the journey, there’s a general unwritten rule. Whoever is standing closest to a seat that becomes available has the greatest claim to the seat. He/she can choose to offer it to a fellow passenger, but it’s against etiquette to make a dash for a seat where the privilege of sitting obviously belongs to another.

Speaking of unwritten rules, there are a few others that should be observed if you don’t want to unduly annoy your fellow passengers. The one that’s probably more annoying than any other, is the subject of occupying seats unnecessarily! Bags and other inanimate objects do not have the right to a seat. Sure, if the trains relatively empty, by all means pile them on a seat, but don’t imagine you can do this during peak times, even if you enter to train at its station of origin where seats are still aplenty. Rather than have a small child occupy a seat, you might consider holding your toddler on your lap, too. Mind you, the rush hour on The Tube isn’t the best place for small children to be, so your best bet would be to wait a couple of hours before making your journey.

Getting back to those bags, another point worth thinking about is what to do with large bags if you have to stand. Do as seasoned tube travellers do, and put them between your legs. No, I don’t mean stuff it up your jacksy, I mean place your bag on the floor and straddle it, one foot on either side. It’ll take far less room this way than if you stood beside it, because your feet still won’t be much further apart that the width of your torso. Standing with your legs apart also make balancing easier, and when those trains are dashing through winding tunnels, swaying from side to side, you’ll need all the balance you can get. An added advantage is that should anybody decide to steal your bags, having body contact with it means you’ll be more likely to feel it being moved.

Body contact. Yes, that’s another subject. I wish I knew how many times I’d felt a ‘lump’ being pushed against my backside on a crowded tube. Please…if anybody who's guilty of this is reading, is it really necessary? I understand that the jiggling motion of the train whilst pressed closed to the body of a member of the opposite sex might cause a sensation that could lead to embarrassment, but it surely isn’t necessary to make a show of it?

On some lines, and at certain stations, a voice will tell you to “mind the gap". The posh female voice is known as Sonia, because she “gets on ya nerves" and “the gap" is a terrifyingly wide opening between the platform and the train door. Being of voluptuous proportions, I’ve never had a fear of disappearing down the gap, but the thought of getting my leg stuck down there has been pretty scary. For goodness sake pick up small children and carry them.

The deepest part of the system is at Hampstead Heath (Northern Line), where the rails are approximately 220 feet below the surface. Being the deepest part of any line, you’d expect to find the longest escalator here wouldn’t you? But you’d be wrong, because of all the 409 escalators, the longest is actually at Angel station, where the escalator is 197 feet long with a vertical rise of 90 feet. That’s one awesome escalator!

Whilst on the subject of moving stairways, I have to tell you that sometimes they don’t work and you have to walk up them, like it or not. There’s nothing quite like getting off a crowded tube train, feeling hot and sweaty and probably in need of murdering somebody, only to be presented with an out-of-order escalator that appears to be several miles long. Unless you’re ultra fit, it just isn’t funny. If they are moving, please remember to stand on the right hand side allowing those who want to walk up or down access to the left. You'll find that passengers often feel the need to run down escalators, causing danger to not only themselves but others travelling the escalator with them. It's a bad habit that you shouldn't indulge in.

Despite being uncomfortable at times, The Tube’s a relatively safe means of travelling around London. The most famous accident must surely be the Moorgate disaster, back in 1975, when 43 people were killed. The second disaster was in 1987 at King’s Cross, when a fire killed 31 people. There have been no other major disasters. There have been a few bombs placed on tube trains over the years, but none have actually exploded on packed trains. The 253 miles of railway is, however, renowned for its suicides. Jumping in front of a tube train seems to have been a fashionable way of killing oneself for quite some time now.

Using the tube is relatively inexpensive with a trip for an adult costing anything from ?1.00 to ?3.60, depending on the length of the journey. This is measured by zones, with zone 1 being within central London. The more zones you travel through, the more they'll charge you. Logical really. Child fares are available for those under 15, under five's travel free.

If you need to know which zone you'll be starting from or how many zones you'll be travelling though, 'TubePlanner' is a useful site to visit (www.tubeplanner.com). The journey planner here is actually easier to use than the one on the official London Underground site (www.thetube.com), although don't tell them I said so. You'll be able to access information such as quickest route, journey time and the fare. You can also look up tourist attractions and find out exactly how to get to them.

Those who use the tube often will always complain about it, but the truth is, without it, London would come to a stand still. The streets of London are already chock-a-block with traffic as it is so any attempt at transporting 900 million passengers over ground each year would lead to nothing less than chaos.

It may not be perfect, but it's by far the quickest and most convenient way of travelling through London. And hey.... even the map's easy to understand!



Author : Sharon Jacobsen
Source : 

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

Greece Travel Guide

Image source: Free range



From the Olympics to My Fat Greek Wedding, Greece has always been a cultural centerpiece in the history of man. Summing up its contribution requires a small library, but here is an overview.
Overview of Greece for Travelers

Greece was home to some of the earliest advanced civilizations. From the Minoans of the second BC millennium to Mycenaeans who established the basis of the current language, the country has produced cultural, philosophical, political and sport advancements unrivaled by others.

The modern Greek state obtained independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1830. It has carried on what seems like a constant conflict with Turkey and was also involved in both World Wars.

In 1981, Greece joined the European Community that eventually evolved into the European Union.

The official name of Greece is the Hellenic Republic. Greece covers an area of roughly 51,000 square miles. Athens is both the capital and largest population center with roughly 3.5 million inhabitants. Thessaloniki is the second largest population area with just over one million people. The terrain of Greece ranges from mountains in the north to flat plains in the south and beautiful islands off the coast. Winters are mild while summers are hot and dry making Greece a huge tourist destination.

The people of Greece are known as Greeks. They total more than 10.96 million. Population growth exists, but it is just above .2 percent annually. Greek is the official language. From a religious perspective, 99 percent of Greeks claim Greek Orthodox as their religion. Literacy rate is 95 percent and all levels of education are absolutely free. Life expectancy is 76 for males and 81 for women.

Greece is a relatively small country, but has accounted for a remarkable number of developments in the trek of mankind through history. Whether you are going to see the culture or loaf on the islands, Greece is a top travel destination for a good reason.


Auhor : Richard Monk

Monday, 18 June 2018

Travel To Germany: The Pulse Of European History




Image Source:free range


Germany has played a significant part in European history, creating waves in time for the rest of the continent to ride out. From Charlemagne and Otto von Bismarck to Nazism and the Cold War, Germany has become the epicenter of cutting-edge culture and music, and centuries of tradition and fine arts. The juxtaposition of medieval towns against ultra-modern industrialism is a fascinating reality to experience.

Thriving Urban Centers of Germany
The capital city of Berlin is by far the most dynamic and diverse metropolis for the German traveler. Despite reunification projects since the Wall came down in 1989, the city is still very much divided between the cosmopolitan chic of the West and the tattered Communist remains of the East. The Stasi Museum , located in East Berlin , is home to the former State Security Service. The intelligence body spied on and badgered citizens throughout the Communist era from this building. The Brandenburger Tor is a monumental building built in 1792 as one of the city's 14 gates. The history of this landmark is tied directly with the enclosing of West Germany from the East as it was essentially barricaded in by the Berlin Wall.

In addition to the other popular urban destinations of Munich and Frankfurt, Aachen (also known as Aix-la-Chapelle ) should not be missed.

It is considered the most international of cities in Germany , being situated close to the Belgian and Netherlands borders. Many citizens and travelers enjoy regular access to both border nations. The main draw is the Aachen Dom (Aachen Cathedral), which is the oldest landmark in Germany . Emperor Charlemagne had the chapel constructed over 1200 years ago and Holy Roman Emperors were coroneted here for nearly 600 years. The cathedral is also said to possess Christ's loincloth as part of its collection.

Fables and Fairytales
The German landscape is something out of your favorite fairytale or Robin Hood adventure. Castles in the sky tower over the rich green forests where Hansel and Gretel ventured to meet their witch. The Black Forest (Schwarzwald) is famous for its intense evergreen canopy, vast outdoor activities and secluded get-a-ways. It also happens to be where Nobel Prize winner Hermann Hesse spent much of his life living and writing. The Maulbronn monastery, situated in the forest's north end, is a UNESCO World Heritage sight that has been carefully preserved. The entire wooded expanse is dotted with medieval and farm towns and is fairly easy to navigate.

The notorious 19th century Bavarian king, Ludwig II (Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm), left his personal legend all over the German countryside in the form of extravagantly ornate castles. Schloss Neuschwanstein is Ludwig's (and Germany 's) most famous construction, particularly because he contracted a stage designer rather than an architect to do the job. Although the monstrosity was never actually finished, visitors may enjoy concerts in the castle's centerpiece, Minstrel's Hall, every September.

Along Germany 's southwest border, The Rhine Valley stretches as a monument to the country's timeless culture and love affair with art, wine, food and beer. The Middle Rhine Valley (also a World Heritage sight) is the most popular segment, studded with medieval and gothic towns and wineries that hold their own festivals annually. Additionally, WWII has left its distinct mark throughout the region despite the many restoration efforts undertaken over the years.

Social revolutions, wars and a fair share of domestic turmoil combined with the legacy of the Holy Roman Empire and the split of the Protestant Church all make Germany unmistakably unique and internationally modern. Travel Germany and discover this historical and yet modern country for yourself.



Author: Frank Johnson

Sunday, 17 June 2018

Secrets Of The London Tube



Image source : Free Range




Although it's many years since I left my home in London I still occasionally use The Tube, as the London Underground is affectionately known.

Hold on. Affectionately? Does anybody actually hold any affection for the network of tunnels that run beneath the surface of our capital, or the rolling stock that runs through them?

They’re over-crowded, far too warm and stuffy (the temperature in the tunnels is about 10 C higher than at ground level), and the views are pretty dire. In central London, all you’re likely to see is the dark walls of the tunnels, although if you’re lucky, you might just get a glimpse of another train passing in another tunnel through one of the gaps between them. Funnily enough, contrary to popular belief, the majority of The Tube is actually over ground. Not that there’s much scenic stimulation along those stretches either. You might see some fascinating factories, some interesting piles of rubbish that have mysteriously grown along the sidings and a few back gardens, but nothing much else.

Anybody who’s ever regularly used The Tube during peak hours will tell you that using this particular form of transport can take great courage and will power. The platforms are crowded to the point where those at the front, closest to the lines, can find themselves fearing for their lives. We’re warned to stand behind the line, which is painted about three feet away from the platform edge, but with all those people behind you, all wanting to get forward and have a chance of getting on the next arriving train, the platform edge can quickly become dangerously close.

Having a position at the front doesn’t necessarily guarantee you a place on the next train though. Oh, no. Whether or not you’ll actually get on it will depend largely upon where on the platform you’re positioned and whether or not the carriage doors will be in front of you when the train stops. If you happen to be standing between two doors, then you’re very unlucky indeed. One way around this is to look at those ‘stand behind’ lines. As the rolling stock on each line of the underground are generally of the same type (the trains differ from line to line) and stop at more or less the same point (note: more or less… this isn’t an exact science), the ‘stand behind’ lines will be more worn where the doors are likely to be. Find those spots and you’ll have a better change of boarding the next one, unless of course the lines are freshly painted, in which case, bad luck.

This next point should be obvious to everybody but unfortunately, my experience tells me that this isn’t the case. When the train stops, even if you’re lucky enough to be standing in front of the doors, LET PASSENGERS OFF THE TRAIN FIRST! Don’t just push your way on, even if others are doing so. It’s bad manners and can cause nasty accidents.

Once on the train, you’ll no doubt have to stand as there are few seats compared with the amount of passengers being transported during peak hours. It’s standard etiquette to offer your seat to elderly passengers and those carrying small children, whether still in the comfortable confines of the womb or otherwise. Anybody else will have little chance of finding a seat. The more experienced underground travellers have their strategies though; they'll target a seat.

Those reading are unlikely to be travelling just a few stops, and although they could have been travelling for ages already, they rarely make good targets. Study people’s faces. If they look bored, they’ve probably already been there a while so maybe they’ll be alighting soon? Mind you, people do get very bored very quickly on The Tube, so they could just as easily have joined the train at the station before yours.

When it comes to seats that are vacated during the journey, there’s a general unwritten rule. Whoever is standing closest to a seat that becomes available has the greatest claim to the seat. He/she can choose to offer it to a fellow passenger, but it’s against etiquette to make a dash for a seat where the privilege of sitting obviously belongs to another.

Speaking of unwritten rules, there are a few others that should be observed if you don’t want to unduly annoy your fellow passengers. The one that’s probably more annoying than any other, is the subject of occupying seats unnecessarily! Bags and other inanimate objects do not have the right to a seat. Sure, if the trains relatively empty, by all means pile them on a seat, but don’t imagine you can do this during peak times, even if you enter to train at its station of origin where seats are still aplenty. Rather than have a small child occupy a seat, you might consider holding your toddler on your lap, too. Mind you, the rush hour on The Tube isn’t the best place for small children to be, so your best bet would be to wait a couple of hours before making your journey.

Getting back to those bags, another point worth thinking about is what to do with large bags if you have to stand. Do as seasoned tube travellers do, and put them between your legs. No, I don’t mean stuff it up your jacksy, I mean place your bag on the floor and straddle it, one foot on either side. It’ll take far less room this way than if you stood beside it, because your feet still won’t be much further apart that the width of your torso. Standing with your legs apart also make balancing easier, and when those trains are dashing through winding tunnels, swaying from side to side, you’ll need all the balance you can get. An added advantage is that should anybody decide to steal your bags, having body contact with it means you’ll be more likely to feel it being moved.

Body contact. Yes, that’s another subject. I wish I knew how many times I’d felt a ‘lump’ being pushed against my backside on a crowded tube. Please…if anybody who's guilty of this is reading, is it really necessary? I understand that the jiggling motion of the train whilst pressed closed to the body of a member of the opposite sex might cause a sensation that could lead to embarrassment, but it surely isn’t necessary to make a show of it?

On some lines, and at certain stations, a voice will tell you to “mind the gap". The posh female voice is known as Sonia, because she “gets on ya nerves" and “the gap" is a terrifyingly wide opening between the platform and the train door. Being of voluptuous proportions, I’ve never had a fear of disappearing down the gap, but the thought of getting my leg stuck down there has been pretty scary. For goodness sake pick up small children and carry them.

The deepest part of the system is at Hampstead Heath (Northern Line), where the rails are approximately 220 feet below the surface. Being the deepest part of any line, you’d expect to find the longest escalator here wouldn’t you? But you’d be wrong, because of all the 409 escalators, the longest is actually at Angel station, where the escalator is 197 feet long with a vertical rise of 90 feet. That’s one awesome escalator!

Whilst on the subject of moving stairways, I have to tell you that sometimes they don’t work and you have to walk up them, like it or not. There’s nothing quite like getting off a crowded tube train, feeling hot and sweaty and probably in need of murdering somebody, only to be presented with an out-of-order escalator that appears to be several miles long. Unless you’re ultra fit, it just isn’t funny. If they are moving, please remember to stand on the right hand side allowing those who want to walk up or down access to the left. You'll find that passengers often feel the need to run down escalators, causing danger to not only themselves but others travelling the escalator with them. It's a bad habit that you shouldn't indulge in.

Despite being uncomfortable at times, The Tube’s a relatively safe means of travelling around London. The most famous accident must surely be the Moorgate disaster, back in 1975, when 43 people were killed. The second disaster was in 1987 at King’s Cross, when a fire killed 31 people. There have been no other major disasters. There have been a few bombs placed on tube trains over the years, but none have actually exploded on packed trains. The 253 miles of railway is, however, renowned for its suicides. Jumping in front of a tube train seems to have been a fashionable way of killing oneself for quite some time now.

Using the tube is relatively inexpensive with a trip for an adult costing anything from ?1.00 to ?3.60, depending on the length of the journey. This is measured by zones, with zone 1 being within central London. The more zones you travel through, the more they'll charge you. Logical really. Child fares are available for those under 15, under five's travel free.

If you need to know which zone you'll be starting from or how many zones you'll be travelling though, 'TubePlanner' is a useful site to visit (www.tubeplanner.com). The journey planner here is actually easier to use than the one on the official London Underground site (www.thetube.com), although don't tell them I said so. You'll be able to access information such as quickest route, journey time and the fare. You can also look up tourist attractions and find out exactly how to get to them.

Those who use the tube often will always complain about it, but the truth is, without it, London would come to a stand still. The streets of London are already chock-a-block with traffic as it is so any attempt at transporting 900 million passengers over ground each year would lead to nothing less than chaos.

It may not be perfect, but it's by far the quickest and most convenient way of travelling through London. And hey.... even the map's easy to understand!

Author: Sharon Jacobsen

Saturday, 16 June 2018

5 Tips For Easy Air Travel






There’s no denying that it has become more and more difficult to fly without running into snags or problems with the airport or the airlines. Enduring the line at the security check point in some airports is enough to put some passengers in a bad mood. However, despite all of the inconveniences that come with flying, it is a necessity. There are several things that can be done to make flying easier and more hassle free, and all that is involved is a little bit of common sense and planning.

1. Get to the Airport Early

Arriving at the airport early is a no-brainer, especially when the airlines tell passengers to arrive at least two hours prior to a flight’s departure time. However, there are many people who refuse to heed this request, and arrive at the airport just several minutes before a flight is scheduled to leave. If there is a line at the check-in counter or at security, this can create a very stressful situation. Not only may the flight be missed, but a new flight must be booked, and the passengers will probably have to travel stand-by on a later flight with no guarantee of a seat until the very last minute.

2. Take a Morning Flight.

Leaving on an early flight does not necessarily mean a 4 a.m. flight must be chosen. However, flights that leave first thing in the morning are less likely to be running late, and they are less likely to be affected by weather problems across the country and/or other planes that may be delayed at other airports. Also, if for some reason the first flight of the day is canceled or delayed, there will probably be several other flights throughout the day that, if necessary, can be taken instead.

3. Try Not to Fly During “Rush Hour”

Airports, like highways, have rush hours. Typically, rush hour in the morning is from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., and in the afternoon from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. These are the hours when airports are the most crowded with people waiting for flights. Crowds mean longer lines at the security check points, more people in the restrooms, more people waiting in restaurant lines, and more people taking up seats in the waiting areas. Flying at a NON-rush hour time of day can alleviate the need to stand in lines and sit with crowds.

4. Try to Take Non-Stop Flights

Obviously, when a non-stop flight is taken, there is less risk of being delayed. Taking off and landing both take quite a bit of time, so avoiding having to do this twice is recommended. There will always be destinations when a non-stop flight is not available, but there are plenty of cities where non-stop flights are just as common as those that stop. It may even be worth a few extra dollars to book a non-stop flight to avoid an unneeded hassle and the possibility of being delayed.

5. Book Connections with Enough Time

If a non-stop flight is not available to a desired destination, make sure to schedule enough time in between flights. When airlines book flights, they often have a layover requirement of 30 or 45 minutes between connections. However, this is often not enough time if the original flight arrives late. In order to avoid this stress, try to schedule connecting flights with at least an hour to spare between the arrival time of the first flight and the departure time of the connecting flight.

 

Destination - Berlin

Source: Free range Berlin brings to one's mind, the Great Divide (or wall) that split the city into two different political en...